The Common Sense of Science

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Faber & Faber #ad - He isolates three creative ideas that have been central to science: the idea of order, the idea of causes and the idea of chance. Trained as a mathematician, he was equally at home with painting and physics, and wrote a series of brilliant books that tried to break down the barriers between 'the two cultures'.

Jacob bronowski was, with kenneth clarke, the greatest popularizer of serious ideas in Britain between the mid 1950s and the early 1970s. The common sense of science, first published in 1951, is a vivid attempt to explain in ordinary language how science is done and how scientists think. He denounced 'the destructive modern prejudice that art and science are different and somehow incompatible interests'.

The Common Sense of Science #ad - We are still living with the consequences of this search for order and causality within the facts that the world presents to us. For bronowski, these were common-sense ideas that became immensely powerful and productive when applied to a vision of the world that broke with the medieval notion of a world of things ordered according to their ideal natures.

Instead, galileo, huyghens and Newton and their contemporaries imagined 'a world of events running in a steady mechanism of before and after'. He wrote a fine book on William Blake while running the National Coal Board's research establishment.

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The Origins of Knowledge and Imagination

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Yale University Press #ad - The mind as an Instrument for Understanding2. The evolution and Power of Symbolic Language3. Knowledge as Algorithm and as Metaphor4. The laws of nature and the Nature of Laws5. Error, progress, and the Concept of Time6. Law and Individual Responsibility. He examines the mechanisms of our perception; the origin and nature of natural language; formal systems and scientific discourse; and how science, as a systematic attempt to establish closed systems one after another, progresses by exploring its own errors and new but unforeseen connections.

. A delightful look at the inquiring mind. Library journal“eminently enjoyable to read, with a good story or ‘bon mot’ on every page. Nature“a well-written and brilliantly presented defense of the scientific enterprise which could be especially valuable to scientists and to teachers of science at all levels.

The Origins of Knowledge and Imagination #ad - Aaas science books & FilmsContents1. He proposes to explain how we receive and translate our experience of the world so that we achieve knowledge. One rejoices in bronowski’s dedication to the identity of acts of creativity and of imagination, whether in Blake or Yeats or Einstein or Heisenberg. Kirkus reviews“according to bronowski, symbolize, imagine, our account of the world is dictated by our biology: how we perceive, etc.

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Science and Human Values

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Faber & Faber #ad - Above all, bronowski strove to make science and technology answerable to social progress, to 'human values. He anticipated the deepening gap between the 'two cultures' and knew that the sciences must be restored to a place in political common sense. George Steiner. Published five years later, it opens unforgettably with Bronowski's description of Nagasaki in 1945: 'a bare waste of ashes', making him acutely aware of science's power both for good and for evil.

Science and Human Values #ad - After such knowledge, a process of trial-and-error, what forgiveness? With care and erudition Bronowski argues that scientific endeavour is an essentially creative act, routinely, part of a great shared human interest in ourselves and the world around us; and, the end of which is not - cannot be - preordained.

Science and human values was originally a lecture by Jacob Bronowski at MIT in 1953.

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The Ascent Of Man

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BBC Digital #ad - Dr jacob bronowksi's the Ascent of Man traces the development of human society through our understanding of science. First published in 1973 to accompany the groundbreaking BBC television series, it is considered one of the first works of 'popular science', illuminating the historical and social context of scientific development for a generation of readers.

In his highly accessible style, agriculture to genetics, Dr Bronowski discusses human invention from the flint tool to geometry, and from alchemy to the theory of relativity, showing how they all are expressions of our ability to understand and control nature. In this new paperback edition, The Ascent of Man inspires, influences and informs as profoundly as ever.

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The Ascent of Jacob Bronowski: The Life and Ideas of a Popular Science Icon

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Prometheus #ad - The first-ever biography of jacob bronowski--one of the leading science popularizers of his generation. Best remembered today for his blockbuster documentary series The Ascent of Man, Jacob Bronowski spent decades explaining scientific ideas to laypersons on television and radio. He revolutionized the study of William Blake, invented smokeless coal, and proved Australopithecus africanus was a relative of humans.

A marvelously eloquent and compelling speaker, science, Bronowski spent the last half of his life teaching the possibilities of humanism, freedom, and peace. He won the british equivalent of an emmy for a radio play he wrote, sparked the "Two Cultures" controversy of the 1960s, led the mission sent to assess the effects of the atomic bomb at Hiroshima and Nagasaki, and cofounded the Salk Institute for Biological Studies with Jonas Salk.

The Ascent of Jacob Bronowski: The Life and Ideas of a Popular Science Icon #ad - In this first-ever biography, author Timothy Sandefur examines the extraordinary accomplishments and fascinating range of thought of this brilliant man. As sandefur documents, the extent of Bronowki's interests and achievements is staggering. This thoroughly researched and eloquently written biography will spark renewed interest in one of the great public intellectuals of the twentieth century.

He was a close friend of Leo Szilard inventor of the atomic bomb and William Empson the prominent poet. A true renaissance man, Bronowski was not only a scientist, but a philosopher and a poet.

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Lies, Damned Lies, and Science: How to Sort through the Noise Around Global Warming, the Latest Health Claims, and Other Scientific Controversies FT Press Science

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FT Press #ad - You’ll learn how to determine whether a new study is really meaningful; uncover the difference between cause and coincidence; figure out which statistics mean something, and which don’t. Brown, targacept, Director, Inc. What’s really going on? who’s telling the truth? who’s faking it? what do scientists actually know–and what don’t they know? This book will help you cut through the confusion and make sense of it all–even if you’ve never taken a science class! Leading science educator and journalist Dr.

Her many examples range from genetic engineering of crops to drug treatments for depression. But the techniques she teaches you will be invaluable in understanding any scientific controversy, in any area of science or health. Comprehensive, and replete with current, useful examples, readable, this book provides a much-needed explanation of how to be a critical consumer of the scientific claims we encounter in our everyday lives.

Lies, Damned Lies, and Science: How to Sort through the Noise Around Global Warming, the Latest Health Claims, and Other Scientific Controversies FT Press Science #ad - April cordero maskiewicz, department of biology, point loma nazarene university   “Seethaler’s book helps the reader look inside the workings of science and gain a deeper understanding of the pathway that is followed by a scientific finding—from its beginnings in a research lab to its appearance on the nightly news.

Jim slotta, ontario institute for studies in education, University of Toronto   “How I wish science was taught this way! Seethaler builds skills for critical thinking and evaluation. Defend yourself! Dr. And every day, it seems as if there’s a new study that contradicts what you heard yesterday.

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Ignorance: How It Drives Science

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Oxford University Press #ad - The process is more hit-or-miss than you might imagine, with much stumbling and groping after phantoms. It is a must-read for anyone curious about science. But it is exactly this "not knowing, the thing that propels them, that gets researchers into the lab early and keeps them there late, " this puzzling over thorny questions or inexplicable data, the very driving force of science.

The book concludes with four case histories--in cognitive psychology, astronomy, theoretical physics, and neuroscience--that provide a feel for the nuts and bolts of ignorance, the day-to-day battle that goes on in scientific laboratories and in scientific minds with questions that range from the quotidian to the profound.

Turning the conventional idea about science on its head, Ignorance opens a new window on the true nature of research. Firestein shows how scientists use ignorance to program their work, what the next steps are, to identify what should be done, and where they should concentrate their energies. And it is ignorance--not knowledge--that is the true engine of science.

Ignorance: How It Drives Science #ad - Most of us have a false impression of science as a surefire, deliberate, step-by-step method for finding things out and getting things done. Knowledge is a big subject, says Stuart Firestein, but ignorance is a bigger one. In fact, says firestein, more often than not, science is like looking for a black cat in a dark room, and there may not be a cat in the room.

And he includes a catalog of how scientists use ignorance, using small questions to get at big ones, revisiting apparently settled questions, consciously or unconsciously--a remarkable range of approaches that includes looking for connections to other research, and tackling a problem simply out of curiosity.

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The Identity of Man Great Minds

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Prometheus Books #ad - With infectious enthusiasm and a gift for conveying theexcitement of ideas, Jacob Bronowski 1908-1974 discusses the impactof science on our sense of self and the need to reevaluate ethics inlight of the scientific perspective. In the final analysis, heemphasizes that these perspectives converge to reveal a moreenlightened, an appreciation of differences, mutualunderstanding, one that fosters tolerance, universal ethics, and a sense that we allshare a common destiny as human participants in nature's cosmic drama.

Bronowski argues that a true humanistic philosophy mustgive equal place to the inner, subjective vision of the arts and theouter, objective perception of science since they are both products ofone self-conscious creative imagination. As both a practicing scientistand an author of books on poetry, he makes interesting connectionsbetween the uses of the imagination in science and in literature.

The Identity of Man Great Minds #ad - Whereas science creates experiments to test hypotheses about theoutside world, he notes that literature also provides "experiments" inpoetry and prose, allowing readers to experience what it means to befully human and relating the individual's inner life to that of everyhuman being.

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Superintelligence: Paths, Dangers, Strategies

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OUP Oxford #ad - Other animals have stronger muscles or sharper claws, but we have cleverer brains. If machine brains one day come to surpass human brains in general intelligence, then this new superintelligence could become very powerful. Yet the writing is so lucid that it somehow makes it all seem easy. After an utterly engrossing journey that takes us to the frontiers of thinking about the human condition and the future of intelligent life, we find in Nick Bostrom's work nothing less than a reconceptualization of the essential task of our time.

. It is to these distinctive capabilities that our species owes its dominant position. The human brain has some capabilities that the brains of other animals lack. Read the book and learn about oracles, and mind crime; about humanity's cosmic endowment and differential technological development; indirect normativity, tripwires, singletons; about boxing methods, instrumental convergence, and biologicalcognitive enhancement, genies, whole brain emulation and technology couplings; Malthusian economics and dystopian evolution; artificial intelligence, and collective intelligence.

Superintelligence: Paths, Dangers, Strategies #ad - This profoundly ambitious and original book picks its way carefully through a vast tract of forbiddingly difficult intellectual terrain. Will it be possible to construct a seed ai or otherwise to engineer initial conditions so as to make an intelligence explosion survivable? How could one achieve a controlled detonation?To get closer to an answer to this question, we must make our way through a fascinating landscape of topics and considerations.

As the fate of the gorillas now depends more on us humans than on the gorillas themselves, so the fate of our species then would come to depend on the actions of the machine superintelligence. But we have one advantage: we get to make the first move.

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On The Nature of Things Illustrated

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#ad - On The Nature of Things Illustrated #ad - Lost for more than a thousand years, its return to circulation in 1417 reintroduced subversive ideas about the nature and meaning of existence and helped shape the modern world. Includes Epicurean image gallery. Pleasant it is, to gaze from shore upon another's great tribulation; not because any man's troubles are a delectable joy, when over a great sea the winds trouble the waters, but because to perceive you are free of them yourself is pleasant.

On the nature of things de rerum Natura stands with Virgil's Aeneid as one of the vital and enduring achievements of Latin literature.

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Naming Nature: The Clash Between Instinct and Science

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W. W. Norton & Company #ad - It is also the latest incarnation of a long-unrecognized human practice that has gone on across the globe, in every culture, in every language since before time: the deeply human act of ordering and naming the living world. In naming nature, yoon takes us on a guided tour of science’s brilliant, if sometimes misguided, attempts to order and name the overwhelming diversity of earth’s living things.

Finalist for the 2009 los angeles times book Prize in Science and Technology: the surprising, untold story about the poetic and deeply human cognitive capacity to name the natural world. Two hundred and fifty years ago, the swedish botanist Carl Linnaeus set out to order and name the entire living world and ended up founding a science: the field of scientific classification, or taxonomy.

Naming Nature: The Clash Between Instinct and Science #ad - We follow a trail of scattered clues that reveals taxonomy’s real origins in humanity’s distant past. Yoon’s journey brings us from new guinea tribesmen who call a giant bird a mammal to the trials and tribulations of patients with a curious form of brain damage that causes them to be unable to distinguish among living things.

Finally, yoon shows us how the reclaiming of taxonomy—a renewed interest in learning the kinds and names of things around us—will rekindle humanity’s dwindling connection with wild nature. Wilson, taxonomy went from being revered as one of the most significant of intellectual pursuits to being largely ignored.

Today, taxonomy is viewed by many as an outdated field, one nearly irrelevant to the rest of science and of even less interest to the rest of the world. Now, taxonomy is critically important, reminds us in Naming Nature, biologist and longtime science writer for the New York Times, as Carol Kaesuk Yoon, because it turns out to be much more than mere science.

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